Done with ‘Stranger Things’? Here Is Your Next Netflix Binge – The New York City Times

This essay includes spoilers for “Stranger Things” and the first season of “Dark.”

It’s a dark night in a rural town surrounded by woods. People are frantically browsing for a little kid who has gone missing. The police seem inept to help. The reason he has gone missing is inexplicable and, possibly, supernatural.

No, this is not a description of the really first episode of “ Complete stranger Things,” but of another engrossing Netflix sci-fi thriller set (in part) in the past: the German time-travel adventure series “Dark.” The 2 programs are frequently compared, and understandably so– when the characters in “Dark” return in time, for example, they typically take a trip to the mid-1980s, the same period in which Eleven and Will check out the Upside Down. There’s also a core group of kids who share a vibrant not unlike the “Stranger Things” good friends in Hawkins, Ind.But the resemblances end there. While Matt and Ross Duffer’s classic journey checks out the lives of their characters for the sake of the plot– each “Complete stranger Things” season begins by developing relationships and characterizations prior to it’s all largely forsaken when the monsters turn up–“Dark”uses the plot to check out and deepen its characters and styles.< a class="css-1g7m0tk "href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/05/arts/television/review-with-dark-netflix-delivers-science-fiction-with-european-roots.html?module=inline"title=""> The first season was normally well gotten when it came out in 2017, drawing comparison to”Twin Peaks” along with”Complete stranger Things.”In its 2nd season, the show’s aspirations are more detailed to those of” The Wire, “as it builds out its world and utilizes its category features– mostly time-travel, in this case– less as plot gimmicks than as methods to deepen the characters and explore their decision making.